Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics



SPECIAL SECTION: TECHNOLOGY AND THE BODY: LINKING LIFE AND TECHNOLOGY

The Bodily Incorporation of Mechanical Devices: Ethical and Religious Issues (Part 2)


COURTNEY S.  CAMPBELL  a1 , LAUREN A.  CLARK  a2 , DAVID  LOY  a3 , JAMES F.  KEENAN  a4 , KATHLEEN  MATTHEWS  a5 , TERRY  WINOGRAD  a6 and LAURIE  ZOLOTH  a7
a1 Department of Philosophy, Oregon State University, Corvallis, Oregon
a2 Department of Religion, Denison University, Granville, Ohio
a3 Xavier University, Cincinnati, Ohio
a4 Theology Department, Boston College, Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts, and Weston Jesuit School of Theology, Cambridge, Massachusetts
a5 Weiss School of Natural Sciences, Rice University, Houston, Texas
a6 Stanford University, Stanford, California
a7 Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois

Article author query
campbell cs   [PubMed][Google Scholar] 
clark la   [PubMed][Google Scholar] 
loy d   [PubMed][Google Scholar] 
keenan jf   [PubMed][Google Scholar] 
matthews k   [PubMed][Google Scholar] 
winograd t   [PubMed][Google Scholar] 
zoloth l   [PubMed][Google Scholar] 

Mechanical devices implanted in the body present implications for broad themes in religious thought and experience, including the nature and destiny of the human person, the significance of a person's embodied experience, including the experiences of pain and suffering, the person's relationship to ultimate reality, the divine or the sacred, and the vocation of medicine. Community-constituting convictions and narratives inform the method and content of reasoning about such conceptual questions as whether a moral line should be drawn between therapeutic or enhancement interventions and/or between somatic and neural/cognitive interventions. By attending to these broader community-forming concepts, it is possible to identify three general orienting themes in religious perspectives on incorporated mechanical devices, which we shall designate as perspectives of “appropriation,” “ambivalence,” and “resistance.”



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