Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society



The NIH MRI study of normal brain development: Performance of a population based sample of healthy children aged 6 to 18 years on a neuropsychological battery


DEBORAH P.  WABER  a1 c1 , CARL  DE MOOR  a1 a2 , PETER W.  FORBES  a2 , C. ROBERT  ALMLI  a3 , KELLY N.  BOTTERON  a4 , GABRIEL  LEONARD  a5 , DENISE  MILOVAN  a5 , TOMAS  PAUS  a5 a6 , JUDITH  RUMSEY  a7 and THE BRAIN DEVELOPMENT COOPERATIVE GROUP
a1 Department of Psychiatry, Children's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts
a2 Clinical Research Program, Children's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts
a3 Program of Occupational Therapy, Neurology and Psychology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri
a4 Department of Psychiatry, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri
a5 Cognitive Neuroscience Unit, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada
a6 Brain and Body Centre, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, United Kingdom
a7 Neurodevelopmental Disorders Branch, National Institute of Mental Health, Bethesda, Maryland

Article author query
waber dp   [PubMed][Google Scholar] 
de moor c   [PubMed][Google Scholar] 
forbes pw   [PubMed][Google Scholar] 
almli cr   [PubMed][Google Scholar] 
botteron kn   [PubMed][Google Scholar] 
leonard g   [PubMed][Google Scholar] 
milovan d   [PubMed][Google Scholar] 
paus t   [PubMed][Google Scholar] 
rumsey j   [PubMed][Google Scholar] 

Abstract

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Study of Normal Brain Development is a landmark study in which structural and metabolic brain development and behavior are followed longitudinally from birth to young adulthood in a population-based sample of healthy children. The neuropsychological assessment protocol for children aged 6 to 18 years is described and normative data are presented for participants in that age range (N = 385). For many measures, raw score performance improved steeply from 6 to 10 years, decelerating during adolescence. Sex differences were documented for Block Design (male advantage), CVLT, Pegboard and Coding (female advantage). Household income predicted IQ and achievement, as well as externalizing problems and social competence, but not the other cognitive or behavioral measures. Performance of this healthy sample was generally better than published norms. This linked imaging-clinical/behavioral database will be an invaluable public resource for researchers for many years to come. (JINS, 2007, 13, 729–746.) a

(Received May 8 2006)
(Revised February 2 2007)
(Accepted March 2 2007)


Key Words: Psychol tests; Child behavior; Child development; Adolescent development; MRI scans; Neuropsychology.

Correspondence:
c1 Correspondence and reprint requests to: Deborah P. Waber, Department of Psychiatry, Children's Hospital Boston, 300 Longwood Avenue, Boston, MA 02115. E-mail: deborah.waber@childrens.harvard.edu


Footnotes

a This project is supported by the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (Contract N01-HD02-3343), the National Institute on Drug Abuse, the National Institute of Mental Health (Contract N01-MH9-0002), and the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (Contracts N01-NS-9-2314, -2315, -2316, -2317, -2319 and -2320). The views stated herein do not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institutes of Health (National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, National Institute on Drug Abuse, National Institute of Mental Health, National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke), or the Department of Health and Human Services, nor any other agency of the United States government.